Want To Really Begin Replacing Worry and Anxiety? Do This Now!

Could Wearing a Mask Be Making You Happier (1)
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Finally Worry Free

“Everyone visualizes whether he knows it or not. Visualization is the great secret
of success.”

Genevieve Behrend

Think of the last time you worried. . .
Were you aware of what was actually going on in your mind? That it kept replaying scary images and scenes over and over again? And that these scary scenes were tied to strong feelings that swept through your body?

Doesn’t it make sense then that one of the main ways you can start replacing your worry and anxiety would be to start replacing those images and scenes? It’s so simple when we think of it this way, right? Yet most of the advice out there doesn’t mention visualization.

Our minds naturally think in pictures. It makes so much sense to get good at visualization.

In this blog post, I’m going to introduce you to this amazing tool we were all born with that can help conquer your worry and anxiety. You’re going to see too that there’s a few secrets to visualization that really make it work.

This post was taken right from my new book Finally Worry Free. In the book, I not only introduce you to visualization, I also give you lots of simple visualization exercises and practices. In addition to learning to create empowering new images and scenes in your mind, the exercises will also help you: heal your past, gain confidence, clear stuck emotions, and more like this – so you can become HAPPIER.

You might be thinking right now that you’re not good at visualization. That when you’ve ever tried to hold images in your mind before, nothing came up. Or you couldn’t sit still long enough to try it. Hold on a sec. I’m going to make myself a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch. Be back soon.

Ok, I’m back. The sandwich was delish. I had it on wheat bread and used strawberry jam. For the peanut butter, I had found this all natural kind that’s nice and creamy. The strawberry jam is from my favorite vendor at the farmer’s market I got last fall. Her booth has all kinds of homemade jams and jellies for sale and she always has samples out in the front for customers to try.

I ate lunch outside on the patio since it’s a beautiful spring day out. My husband mowed the lawn early this morning and I loved smelling the fresh cut grass. Aside from being the perfect place to catch a really nice breeze, the patio is a great spot to listen to the birds chirping and singing.

Ok, where was I? Oh, yea. You say you’re not good at visualization? Gotcha!

What are you having for lunch today? Turkey and cheese? Did you know that you’re going to visualize it first? You’re going to picture yourself making that sandwich. You’re going to picture yourself eating that sandwich. And everything in between before you do any of it. It’s just how we work. It all happens so fast and fleeting, we don’t pay attention to it.

So yes, you can visualize. And it’s one of the most powerful tools you can ever learn to get good at. Do you want a new kind of sandwich for lunch? Picture one in your mind. Do you want a new life in some ways like with less worry and anxiety? Create the pictures in your mind first.

Here are some points about visualization:


• When you catch yourself playing scary images over and over again in your mind right there and then, change those images with visualization. Create a new scene in your mind and then try and spend a little while installing it into your subconscious mind by repeating it over and over again with feeling. Keep imagining more detail. Keep letting the pictures get clearer and brighter and bigger.


• Repetition. I can’t stress this enough. I believe this is the main reason why many people conclude that visualization doesn’t work. They try it a few times or for a few weeks and then decide it’s a sham. If they only knew that those scary images that are playing in the back of their mind have most likely been playing for years and years. Two weeks of visualizing new scenes is not going to cut it. And visualization is not exactly the latest fad.


“What we think, we become.”
Buddha


• Add feeling to your visualization. Lots of feeling. In fact, exaggerate them. Make them huge and strong.


• Use as many of your five senses as possible while you’re visualizing. If you are visualizing that you’re at the beach imagine seeing the sky and the ocean; hearing the waves; smelling the salty mist; feeling the breeze, the heat of the sun, and the sand in your toes; and tasting the lemonade.


• Put as many details as you can into your visualizations. What else do you see on that beach? Add it all in.


• Just like affirmations, visualize as much as you can. Use it for everything and anything. From replacing worrisome images and scary scenarios that you keep playing out in your mind over and over again, to seeing yourself in all of your goals. Use it for short term goals, like seeing yourself in projects you’re working on to seeing yourself in your dream home or job.


• It’s important to also see yourself and feel yourself with new qualities that you are working on like confidence.


• Be okay with the way you see your visualizations. Some people see images very clearly, while others see them faintly. Some people see images that seem to be fleeting and some people may feel they are not really seeing anything at all. All of these scenarios are perfectly fine.


• Write scripts out for your visualizations. You can then just read the scripts to yourself. Every time you read it, your mind will be playing out the images. You can also speak the scripts into your phone recorder and listen to them during the day.


• Add affirmations to your visualizations.


• You can visualize as if you are watching a scene of yourself on a huge movie screen. More powerful, though, is when you visualize as if you are actually in the scene – in the here and now. Athletes do this when they keep playing out moves in their minds over and over again. What’s really good to do is start out picturing the scene in front of you and then jump into the scene. So, you’re using both types of visualization.

I hope this post has inspired you to start visualizing better scenes in your mind. As I mentioned, my book has lots of visualizations in it. I’ll also be teaching visualization first hand in my new group coaching program. If you would like to see what it’s all about, the first week is free. Just check out the group coaching page on this website and email me to say you’d like to come to the first week free at: paulal@simplybeinghappy.com

Here’s the link to my book on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3fX0hzk

Thanks for reading!

Paula

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Paula Sullivan - Simply Being Happy

I’m Paula.  I created Finally Worry Free to teach you how to replace all the negative programming, so you can worry less and enjoy your days more.

Blackstone, Massachusetts.

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